Horse Hearing

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Horse's Ears

A horse’s hearing is much keener than ours. They use their hearing for three primary functions: to detect sounds, to determine the location of the sound, and to provide sensory information that allows the horse to recognize the identity of these sounds. Horses can hear low to very high frequency sound, in the range of 14 Hz to 25 kHz (human range = 20 Hz to 20 kHz). Horses’ ears can move 180 degrees …

Horse Body Language

Understanding the behavior and body language of horses can keep you and others safe while working with horses. This article provides some common body language signs and signals, along with descriptions or translations of each.

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Most of the time, horses use body language to communicate with each other. As horses communicate with each other, they can tell if they are playful, mad, or submissive. The more you are around horses, the better you will …

Types of Equine Behavior

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Animal behavioralists have classified the social behavior of horses (and other animals) into the following categories:

Mare's head
  • Contactual behavior – behavior related to seeking affection, protection, or similar benefits derived from contact with other animals
  • Ingestive behavior – behavioral activities associated with eating and drinking
  • Eliminative behavior – behavioral activities associated with defecation and urination
  • Sexual behavior – behavior related to mating between males and females
  • Epimeletic behavior – behavior related to giving care and

Horse Senses

The senses are an important part of what makes horses behaviorally distinct. They are the tools that a horse uses to interact with its environment. This article discusses how horses use their five senses to interact with their environment.

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Animals, like humans, have five basic senses: vision, audition (hearing), olfaction (smell), gustation (taste), and touch. The senses are an important part of what makes horses behaviorally distinct. They are the tools that a horse …

Horse Feeding Behavior

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Horses devote more time to eating than to any other behavioral activity. Behavior has direct effects on consumption patterns and the selection of feeds. Probably no other single factor is as important to the well-being and productivity of the horse as the feed and forage it consumes. Horses, like humans, need food and water to survive.

Ingestive Behavior

The time a horse spends consuming feed is controlled by a number of factors. Grazing time …

Abnormal Horse Behavior

Clint Depew, Extension Horse Specialist, Louisiana State University

Animal behavior experts often refer to vices (bad habits) as stereotypies because they are often rooted in the behavioral nature of the animal. Understanding that vices are behaviorally based may assist in preventing and/or treating these problems. Common vices are described below.

Wood chewing This occurs with both stabled and pastured horses and research suggests that this can be due to a lack of fiber in the diet, or due to boredom.