Permanent Identification in horses

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Equine Freeze Brand
on Shoulder

 

Using colorings and markings to identify a horse is a good method of horse identification, but what if a horse has no unique markings, such as one with solid bay coloring and no white facial or leg markings?

How would the owner identify his or her horse from a group of solid bays with no white markings? One way to do this is to use permanent identification methods to mark the horse.

Not …

Identification Using Signalments in Horses

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Signalments – Colorings and Markings

There are two types of identification methods used by the horse industry that enable individuals to keep track of their horses. One uses the horse’s natural markings and colorings, called signalments, and the other uses permanent markings. Every horse owner should keep a detailed record of the specific coloring and markings of his or her horse. Some breed associations and other groups require that a horse identification record …

Horse Senses

The senses are an important part of what makes horses behaviorally distinct. They are the tools that a horse uses to interact with its environment. This article discusses how horses use their five senses to interact with their environment.

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Animals, like humans, have five basic senses: vision, audition (hearing), olfaction (smell), gustation (taste), and touch. The senses are an important part of what makes horses behaviorally distinct. They are the tools that a horse …

Equine Laminitis or Founder

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Laminitis is an inflammation of the sensitive laminae of one or more hooves. Severe pain can result from poor circulatory congestion in the foot. When the sensitive laminae become inflamed, the union between the hoof and the laminae can separate. In severe cases the coffin bone can rotate and begin to penetrate the sole.

A foundered horse often has a distorted hoof with characteristic “founder rings,” a long toe that curls if …

Horse Feeding Behavior

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Horses devote more time to eating than to any other behavioral activity. Behavior has direct effects on consumption patterns and the selection of feeds. Probably no other single factor is as important to the well-being and productivity of the horse as the feed and forage it consumes. Horses, like humans, need food and water to survive.

Ingestive Behavior

The time a horse spends consuming feed is controlled by a number of factors. Grazing time …

Relating Form to Function: Horse's Front Legs, Side View

Ideal alignment of the horse's front legs, as viewed from the side.
Ideal alignment of the horse’s front legs, as viewed from the side.

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

When viewed from the side, the front column of bones should have the appropriate slope and angle of shoulder and pastern. Additionally, a straight line should run from the center of the scapula and bisect the leg equally in half, touching the heel of the hoof as pictured in the “ideal” side view.

Camped-under is a condition in which the forelimbs are …

Relating Form to Function: Horse's Frontlegs, Front View

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Horse's straight column of bone

The horse’s forelimb bears 65 percent of its body weight. Therefore, it is extremely important for a horse to have straight, structurally correct front legs. Due to the amount of weight on the forelimbs, horses suffer from more front leg injuries due to trauma and concussion than any other type of leg injuries.

Ideally, when viewing the forelegs from the front, a straight line from the point of the shoulder should bisect the entire …

Equine Viral Rhinopneumonitis in horses

Ashley Griffin, University of Kentucky

Equine viral rhinopneumonitis (EVR) produces an acute respiratory catarrh, which is inflammation due to excessive discharge or buildup of mucus in the throat and nose. The Type I strain of EVR is the most common virus found in horses. Transmission of EVR occurs with direct or indirect contact with virus-laden nasal discharge, aborted fetus, or placenta. 

Clinical Signs

 

1. congestion and clear nasal discharge
2. mild to server ataxia or paresis (slight of incomplete paralysis) of …

Horses and Water

Water is the most important nutrient for horses. The average adult horse drinks between 10 and 12 gallons each day. This article contains information on the importance of water to horses.

Water Needs for Horses

Clean, fresh, palatable water should be available to the horse at all times.

A mature, idle horse (500 kg) will require between 10 and 12 gallons of water per day, depending on environmental and/or physiological conditions.

Horses drinking from a Water Tank

Factors that change water consumption:

  1. pregnancy
  2. lactation
  3. work
  4. profuse